Posts Tagged ‘Designing Templates’

How To? – How (And Why) You Should Use Text Boxes In Word Label Templates

Tuesday, July 17th, 2018

This week, we’re taking a look at just how useful text boxes can be in Word label templates.

You might think that it’s far easier to simply type your text into your template. Or just use copy and paste.

However, there are some benefits to using text boxes in Word label templates that might just make you reconsider. Especially if you want your label design to contain lots of different sections or areas of text.

USING TEXT BOXES IN WORD LABEL TEMPLATES – THE BENEFITS

There are two main benefits to using text boxes instead of simply typing in your text.

  1. You can get greater control over the positioning of specific areas of text.
  2. You can take advantage of the text box formatting tools to add additional design elements.

The former applies to label designs made up of multiple elements.

For example, you may have a design containing an image and some text. Putting your text into a text box creates two single objects that you can format and position. This is easier than trying to position an image relative to text that you have typed into your template. It can also give you greater control over the positioning of both elements, provide more formatting options, and allow you to create more sophisticated designs made up of overlapping layers.

Alternatively, you might have a bunch of text that you want to break up into separate sections, which you can then individually position around your design. For example, you might want a product name at the top, product information in the bottom left corner, and company information in the bottom right corner. You could try typing in all of that information and then manually spacing it out to create your required layout. A better solution is to use three separate text boxes, which you can edit and position independently of each other.

When you create a text box, you also gain a few extra formatting options. For example, you can format the text itself, as well as the border, background, and shaping of your text box. Word has a variety of formats and effects that you can apply to your text AND your text box to make your design really stand out.

USING TEXT BOXES IN WORD LABEL TEMPLATES – INSERTING A TEXT BOX (AND TEXT)

word label templates - adding a text box

To insert a text box, click on the Insert tab at the top of the page and select Text Box. Word will give you a number of pre-formatted options along with a basic text box. If you like the look of one of the existing options, select it from the list (you can change the formatting later). Alternatively, choose the basic “Simple Text Box” so you have a blank canvas onto which you can add your own design elements. The simple text box contains placeholder text. Simply delete this out of the way and type in your required text.

USING TEXT BOXES IN WORD LABEL TEMPLATES – FORMATTING A TEXT BOX (AND/OR ITS TEXT)

Next, you’ll need to format your text box (and text) to make it look the part for your required design.

There are a number of ways you can format your text box (and text). For some of these, you’ll need to remember that the text box and the text within it are two separate elements forming a whole. Some formatting options will affect BOTH elements. Others will only apply to the text or the text box.

word label templates - formatting a text box

FORMATTING A TEXT BOX (AND/OR ITS TEXT) – The Size

Left click on your text box once to select it. You can then change the size of the text box in two ways.

  1. MANUALLY RESIZE: click on one of the sizing handles at the corners or middle of each edge. Hold down the left button and then move your cursor to increase or decrease the size of your text box before releasing the button. The corner handles allow you to change the width and height simultaneously, while the middle handles can only change one measurement at a time.
  2. USE THE SIZE TOOL: the size of your text box is displayed on the right hand side of the Drawing Tools Format tab. Change the measurements in the width and height boxes to change the size of your text box. This can be a more precise way to resize your text box, compared to doing it manually.

FORMATTING A TEXT BOX (AND/OR ITS TEXT) – The Text

Left click once on your text box to select it (and the text inside). You can make basic formatting changes using the Font Tools under the Home tab. For example, you can change the font, font size, font colour, and add emphasis (e.g. bold, italics, etc).

For more formatting options, use the Drawing Tools Format tab. In the WordArt Styles section, you will see plenty of formatting options that apply to the text itself.

This includes pre-formatted options as well as formatting tools that allow you to change the colour of your text, add a border to your text, and add shaping to your text. For example, you can add shadowing, reflections, glow and bevel effects, rotate your text, or use one of the “Transform” options to warp the shape of your text or make it follow a circular/semi-circular path.

FORMATTING A TEXT BOX (AND/OR ITS TEXT) – The Text Box

Tools in the Shape Styles section of the Drawing Tools Format tab allow you to format the text box itself. You can change the fill (background) of your text box, the outlines (border), and add shaping. For example, shadowing, reflections, glow and bevel effects, soft edges, and rotation effects.

You may need to change the background and border of your text box if you are creating a layered design. By default, text boxes have a solid white background and a black border. If your text box sits over another element – particularly one of a different colour – you need to make the background transparent and remove the border.

Select your text box and click on the Drawing Tools Format tab. To add a transparent background, click on Shape Fill and select No Fill. To remove the border, click on Shape Outline and select No Outline. Both of these are listed in the Shape Styles section of the ribbon.

Please note that adding a border to a text box will increase its overall size. You may need to bear this in mind if you are trying to create a border around the edges of your sticky labels or if your text box sits close to the edges of your blank labels – as your text box may end up being too big to sit in the correct position for your required design.

The “Edit Shape” option in the Insert Shapes section can be used to add a particular shape to your text box. This can be extremely useful if you are creating text boxes for use in sticky labels that have a particular shape – e.g. round labels / circular labels and oval labels.

By default, text boxes are given a Wrap Text format of “Square”. This should offer enough flexibility when positioning your text box within your label template. If you can’t position your text box as you’d like, try using “Tight”.

USING TEXT BOXES IN WORD LABEL TEMPLATES – LAYERING TEXT BOXES

To layer your text boxes above or below other elements in your design, use the Bring Forward and Send Backward options in the Drawing Tools Format tab. Each one provides you with three options:

  1. “Bring Forward” / “Send Backward” moves your text box forward or backward by one layer. I.e. it will move in front of or behind the adjacent layer/element.
  2. “Bring To Front” / “Send To Back” makes your text box the topmost or bottommost element regardless of how many elements you have layered above or below your selected text box.
  3. “Bring In Front Of Text” / “Send Behind Text” moves your text box so that it sits in front of or behind other elements that contain text.

Next week on Template Tuesday – How To? – How (And Why) You Should Perform A Test Print Of Your Label Templates

How To? – How (And Why) You Should Format Images In Word Label Templates

Tuesday, July 10th, 2018

Word is a word processor, which means that it will always be most efficient at handling words. It can be harder to work with images – especially in Word label templates. This post will talk you through some of the most important ways you can format (or edit) images to make it easier to create your required design – as well as explaining why it’s important to make use of these formatting options.

Formatting Images In Word Label Templates – WRAP TEXT

Among the most important tools (if not THE most important tool) for formatting images is the WRAP TEXT option. This tool allows you to choose how you want Word to position your image in relation to the text around it.

You may wonder why this is important – especially if your Word label template doesn’t contain any words.

The problem is that – as a word processor – Word assumes that you will add text at some point. It therefore uses a default Wrap Text format called “In Line With Text”. This positions your image “in line” with your text – regardless of whether or not you’ve actually added any text.

Essentially, Word divides your label template into (invisible) lines in preparation for the text it thinks you’re going to add. If you add an image, Word will only let you align it in relation to one of these lines. This limits where you can position your image. If you need even a little bit of control over the positioning of your image, you’ll need to change this setting.

It also gives you access to some formatting tools that are NOT available under the “In Line With Text” wrap option. It’s always worth changing the wrap text format even if you can position your image just fine with the default option.

How To Use Wrap Text In Word Label Templates.

Left click once on your image to select it. This will bring up the Picture Tools Format tab at the top of the page.

The Wrap Text tool is contained in the “Arrange” section of the ribbon.

You have a variety of options to choose from; we recommend choosing “Tight”. This means that Word will allow your image to sit very close to your text – giving you more flexibility over where you can position that image in your template.

If you have problems with your image disappearing behind your template or other text-based elements in your design, try using “In Front Of Text”.

word label templates formatting images wrap text

Formatting Images In Word Label Templates – BRING FORWARD & SEND BACKWARD

If you are creating a design by layering multiple elements (e.g. text, text boxes, WordArt, shapes, images etc), you will need to use the Bring Forward and Send Backward tools to layer your elements correctly.

You may also need to use the Bring Forward option, even if you aren’t layering elements. As we mentioned above, Word is designed primarily to handle text. This causes Word to also prioritise text-based elements over images. The result being that images that you add to your template may end up sitting behind the template itself (because it is a table and Word assumes you will want to add text to it at some point.

How To Use Bring Forward & Send Backward In Word Label Templates.

Left click once on your image to select it. This will bring up the Picture Tools Format tab at the top of the page.

Both the Bring Forward and Send Backward tools are contained in the “Arrange” section of the ribbon and provide three options.

  1. “Bring Forward” / “Send Backward” will move your image forward or backward by one layer. I.e. it will move in front of or behind the adjacent layer/element.
  2. “Bring To Front” / “Send To Back” will make your image the topmost or bottommost element regardless of how many elements you have layered above or below your selected image.
  3. “Bring In Front Of Text” / “Send Behind Text” will move your image so that it sits in front of or behind of ALL of the elements that contain text.

Remember, this includes elements that Word assumes you may want to add text to in the future – including the table used to create the label template itself.

If an image (or other element) is completely covered by another element, you may struggle to click on it to select it in order to layer it correctly. Click on the element that is covering it to bring up the Picture Tools Format (or Drawing Tools Format) tab. In the “Arrange” section, there is a tool called Selection Pane. This will bring up a pane on the right hand side, which shows ALL of the elements in your label template. Clicking on one of the elements in the selection pane will select that element for you.

Formatting Images In Word Label Templates – (RE)SIZE IMAGES

Obviously, if your design includes images they need to be the right size to fit onto your blank labels.

While you can add images into a Word label template and THEN resize them, we recommend trying to ensure that your images are about the right size BEFORE adding them to your template. Making minor adjustments to the size within a template is easy enough but adding in images that are too big or too small can cause extra problems.

For example, adding very large images could cause Word to try to be helpful by automatically changing the size and layout of your template to accommodate your content. This effectively destroys the alignment produced when you print your template.

A more common issue is that resizing images can also lower the quality of the image – especially if your image has low resolution. Making sure your image is the right size BEFORE you add it to your template helps to preserve the image quality.

One of our top tips is to paste your image into a blank Word document so that you can check to make sure that the image is the right size and quality for your needs – before pasting it into your label template.

How To Resize Images In Word Label Templates.

There are two ways to resize an image.

  1. Left click once on your image to select it. Selected images have sizing “handles” at the four corners and along each of the four edges of the image. Click on one of the handles and hold down the button as you drag your cursor outwards (to increase the size) or inwards (to decrease the size) – release the button to resize your image. The corner handles will alter the width AND height of the image; central handles only alter the width OR the height.
  2. Left click once on your image to select it. The far right section of the Picture Tools Format tab will indicate the width and height of your image. Enter the measurements that you want into these boxes to resize your image to a precise size.

With both options, you need to be aware that images may or may not have a “locked aspect ratio”. This refers to the relationship between the width and height of your image. A locked aspect ratio means that when you resize an image, Word preserves the proportions of your image.

For example, if you change the width of a 5cm by 5cm image to 3cm, the height will automatically change to 3cm to preserve the aspect ratio. Likewise, if you try to use a corner sizing handle to resize your image, you will only be able to create a larger or small square-shaped image.

If the aspect ratio is not locked, you can alter the width and the height independently of one another.

To change this setting, right click on your image and select “Size and Position”. On the Size tab, check or uncheck “Lock aspect ratio” as required.

word label templates - formatting images - resize image

Formatting Images In Word Label Templates – CROP IMAGES

Finally, you may need to crop your images to ensure they are a suitable shape for your label size.

For example, your original image may be rectangular in size but you need a square image for your square labels. Alternatively, you may have an image with a larger background area than you need, in which case you can use the Crop tool to reduce the original image to the area that you actually need/want to use.

Cropping images can also be a useful tool when you need your image to fill each blank label. You can crop your image down to the correct shape OR remove any unnecessary blank/background areas that prevent your image from fitting in your label template properly.

How To Crop Images In Word Label Templates.

Left click once on your image to select it. This will bring up the Picture Tools Format tab at the top of the page.

The Crop tool is contained in the “Size” section of the ribbon. You can crop your image in a number of ways:

  1. Clicking on the Crop button will add crop handles to your image. You use these in the same way as the sizing handles – only when you release the button, your image will be cropped to the area that you select rather than resized.
  2. Selecting Crop To Shape in the drop down list will create a shaped area into which you can crop your image (you can choose the size of this area using the crop handles). This is a quick way to, for example, crop a rectangular image down into a circular image.
  3. Selecting Aspect Ratio in the drop down list allows you to make sure that when you crop your image you can create a specific aspect ratio accurately (compared to trying to do this manually using the crop handles).

word label templates - formatting images - crop

Next Week On Template Tuesday: How To? – How (And Why) You Should Use Text Boxes In Word Label Templates

How To? – How To Use Label Planet’s Bleed Label Templates

Tuesday, July 3rd, 2018

So far, we’ve taken a closer look at what bleed label templates are and when to use one rather than a standard template. This week, we’ll look at how to use bleed label templates to create full colour labels.

What Sort Of Bleed Label Templates Do We Supply?

Our website features bleed label templates in Word and PDF formats. Word templates can be used with Microsoft Word or any word processing software that can edit .docx files (e.g. Pages). The PDF bleed label templates can be used with any graphics package that can edit .pdf files (e.g. InDesign, Illustrator, Photoshop etc).

As we explained in our previous post, our PDF bleed label templates will contain two outlines for each blank label. The solid black outline indicates the size and shape of each label. The dotted grey outline indicates the bleed area around each label.

The bleed area is a blank space around your sticky labels that you can use to overlap your design to prevent white edging when you print your sticky labels. Instead of finishing at the edges of each blank label, your design will end within the bleed area – meaning that it overlaps the edges of your blank labels.

Our Word bleed label templates contain areas that represent the blank labels themselves AND the bleed area around them.

How Do You Use Bleed Label Templates?

Essentially, you use our bleed label templates in exactly the same way as you would our standard label templates.

The only thing you need to bear in mind is where the edges of your design fall. Your design should extend outside of the blank labels so that it ends somewhere within the bleed area. You can set up your design so it finishes partway into the bleed area or fills the bleed area entirely. The only thing that matters is that your design overlaps the edges of your blank labels.

Using Word Bleed Label Templates

In a standard Word label template, your design should fit inside the cells representing each blank label.

Word label templates are basically tables where the cells represent your blank labels and any gaps in the layout of each A4 sheet. This means that round labels are represented by a grid of squares and oval labels by a grid of rectangles.

Standard desktop printers can only provide so much accuracy when aligning label templates onto sheet labels. This means that if your design includes a full colour background, logo, or image you may get white edging around some of your sticky labels where your design isn’t quite perfectly aligned. While you can adjust your template and printer settings to improve the alignment, it is very difficult to align a whole sheet perfectly. Instead, you can use a bleed label template to oversize your design to prevent white edging appearing at all.

In the image below, we have added a colour logo to a row from a STANDARD label template and a BLEED label template for our LP15/51R round label size.

Label Templates - Word Standard And Bleed Template

In the standard label template, the design touches the four sides of the cell. This means the design fits within the label itself. With this template, you would probably get some white edging around some of your labels.

In the bleed label template, however, the same logo has been resized slightly to fill the larger cell. In this template, each cell represents a blank label and its bleed area. By filling the cell, the blue background will overlap each label slightly, preventing white edging from happening when you print the completed template.

Remember, when working with images in Word, you will need to adjust the Wrap Text format option to give you greater control over the positioning of your images. Left click on your image once to select it. Click on the Picture Tools Format tab at the top of the page. Click on Wrap Text and choose Tight (or In Front Of Text). If you have multiple elements within your design, you will need to use the “Bring Forward”/“Send Backward” options to layer your elements as needed. Remember that the table used to create your label template is a layer in itself so you need to make sure that your design elements sit in front of it – or they may disappear from view!

Using PDF Bleed Label Templates

Likewise, you would use our PDF bleed label templates in much the same way as our standard PDF label templates.

Instead of making sure that your design sits within the solid black border outlining each label, however, you would simply need to make sure that your design finishes between the solid black border and the dotted grey border that outlines the bleed area.

In the image below, we have added our colour logo to a STANDARD label template and a BLEED label template.

Label Templates - PDF Standard And Bleed Template

In the standard label template, the design sits within the black border that indicates the shape of the blank label. As with the standard Word label template, it would be extremely tricky to perfectly align every single label.

In the bleed label template, we have resized the design slightly. It now extends beyond the black border (representing the label) to touch the grey border (representing the bleed area). This means that the blue background will overlap each label slightly and prevent any white edges appearing when you print the completed template.

Next week on Template Tuesday: How To? – How (And Why) You Should Format Images In Word Label Templates

How To? – How To Use Label Planet’s Mirrored Label Templates

Tuesday, June 12th, 2018

Last week, we explained how to use our text box label templates. This week, we’re taking a look at our mirrored label templates. The two are essentially the same with one key difference. In our mirrored label templates, each text box has been mirrored (or reversed). In this post, we’ll explain why these label templates are set up in this way, when to use them, and how to use them to design and print your own self adhesive labels.

What Are Mirrored Label Templates?

In addition to providing Word label templates and PDF label templates for all of our label sizes, we also  supply a range of formats to suit the various kinds of designs that our customers may want to produce. One of these extra formats is our mirrored label templates.

In this format, your label template will include a mirrored text box in each of the blank labels on your sheet. Like our text box label templates, each text box has a centralised layout and allows your text to fit neatly within each blank label.

mirrored label templates

Each text box has been rotated to flip your text box into a reverse or mirrored position. To read the text you either need to hold it up to a mirror OR view the text from the reverse side.  – as is the case when printing transparent window stickers.

You can use the mirrored text boxes as they are or change them to suit your required label design.

When Should You Use Mirrored Label Templates?

The main use for mirrored label templates is to create window stickers. Your mirrored design can be printed onto transparent labels that are to be applied onto the “inside” side of a window. When viewed from outside, the text appears in the “correct” direction.

The text boxes are set up to ensure that your design fits neatly within your blank labels AND is automatically mirrored. So you don’t have to worry about making too many adjustments yourself. Mirrored label templates are brilliant for beginners who haven’t designed window stickers at all. They’re especially useful if you’re not confident or familiar with Word’s tools – like those required to reverse designs. This label template does most of the work for you. All you need to do is replace the text in each text box and choose any style elements that you want to add to personalise your design. You can also use these label templates if you’re more experienced BUT you’d like to use a template that speeds up the design process.

How Do You Use Mirrored Label Templates?

Left click inside the first text box. The text box will automatically shift into a non-mirrored view until you click outside of the box. At this point, your text will revert to its mirrored state. After clicking inside the text box, select the existing placeholder text and delete it. Type in the text you want printed onto your sticky labels.

Repeat this process for each of the text boxes in your label template OR use copy and paste to speed things up…

  • Select and copy the text you have entered into the first text box. Click into the second text box, delete the existing text, and then paste your text into that text box. Repeat for each of the text boxes in your label template OR…
  • Delete all of the text boxes – EXCEPT FOR THE FIRST ONE. Select the first label (including the text box) by positioning your cursor in the bottom left corner of the first label and triple clicking the left button on your mouse quickly. Copy this selection and then paste it into the rest of your blank labels.

mirrored label templates - add your own textYou can replace the existing text and print your sticky labels although you may want to add extra design features. The simplest way to decorate text-based designs is to change the font and to add elements like a coloured background or image

To do this, we recommend adding your design to the first blank label only. Then delete the rest of the mirrored text boxes before using copy and paste to fill in your label template.

How To Change The Font Of Your Text Box

You can change the font of your text BEFORE or AFTER adding your text.

  • BEFORE: Delete the existing placeholder text from the first text box. Select your font and style options using the “Font” section of the HOME tab and/or the “WordArt Styles” section of the DRAWING TOOLS FORMAT tab. Then type in your required font.
  • AFTER: Delete the existing text from the first text box and type in (or paste in) your required text. Select your text and then apply your preferred font and style options.

mirrored label templates - choosing font and style optionsYou can also decorate the text box itself, for example, by adding a border or coloured background. Click on the DRAWING TOOLS FORMAT tab at the top of the page. Change the format of your text box using the tools in the “Shape Styles” section.

Think carefully about the shape and layout of your label size when adding coloured backgrounds and borders. To create a coloured background, your text box must fill each blank label (or overlap it slightly if possible). Borders must be thick enough to overlap the edges of your blank labels. This will increase the overall size of your text box, so you may need to resize your text box to get the correct alignment.

How To Add Images & Background To Your Mirrored Label Template

You can add images or additional text boxes next to the existing text boxes.

Adding Additional Elements Next To Your Text Box

First, reduce the size of the existing text box to make room for your image or new text box. Next, use the INSERT tab to insert your image or text box (or paste an image / text box copied from elsewhere). We recommend making sure your image is the right size before pasting it into your label template. We also recommend changing the Wrap Text format to Tight. To do this, select your image and click on the PICTURE TOOLS FORMAT tab that appears at the top of the page. Click on “Wrap Text” and select “Tight”. This will allow you much greater control over the positioning of your image.

Remember that item you add that contains any directional elements (e.g. text) will need to be mirrored:

  • Mirror an image: select your image and click on the PICTURE TOOLS FORMAT tab. Click on “Rotate” and select “Flip Horizontal”.
  • Mirror a text box: select your text box and click on the DRAWING TOOLS FORMAT tab. Click on “Shape Effects” (in Shape Styles). Select 3-D Rotation from the drop down list and click on 3-D Rotation Options. In the sidebar, set “X Rotation” to 180°. This will add a grey background to your text box. Click on “Shape Fill” and select “No Fill” (for a transparent box) or white (for a white background).

mirrored label template - adding an image

Adding Additional Elements Behind Your Text Box

Alternatively, you could add an image or background colour behind your text box.

You may need to resize the image to fill your blank label. You should also change the Wrap Text format to Tight. Next, select your text box and click on the DRAWING TOOLS FORMAT tab. Click on “Bring Forward” and select “Bring To Front”. This will layer your text box on top of your image.

Remember to flip directional images as outlined above.

You can also add a background colour by changing the colour of the template itself (which is basically a table). Select the table by moving your cursor to the top left of the table until it turns into a four headed arrow. Left click once to select the table. Now you can click on the TABLE TOOLS DESIGN tab at the top of the page and use the “Shading” option to add a background colour. Remember that this colour will ONLY apply to your template. You could add the same colour background to your text box – although our mirrored text boxes are transparent by default. This can be done using the “Shape Fill” option in the DRAWING TOOLS FORMAT tab.

Remember, if you are adding any additional elements we strongly recommend setting up your design in the first blank label. Delete the existing text boxes from the rest of the label template. Then select your first completed label. Place your cursor in the bottom left corner and triple click the left button quickly. Copy your design and then paste it into the rest of your blank labels.

Download Mirrored Label Templates From Label Planet

To download any of our label templates, simply head on over to our Label Templates home page. Click on your label shape and select your label size from the list. This takes you to the individual Label Template information page for your self adhesive labels. Download links can be found in the middle of this page. Our mirrored label templates are listed under the Word Templates column. Choose a portrait or landscape mirrored label template (if applicable) and left click once on the purple link to start the download process.

Your label template will usually be downloaded to your Downloads folder. If you are asked if you want to open or save the file, we recommend choosing save. We also recommend opening Word (or other word processing software) first and using “File” > “Open” to locate and open your label template. Remember, the file will probably be locked for security reasons because you downloaded it from the internet. There should be a yellow banner going across the top of the page. Click on the Enable Editing button to unlock the label template.

You should be able to see the layout of your sticky labels in the form of a dotted grey outline. If you cannot see this outline, Table Gridlines are turned off. To turn them on again, left click once anywhere in the middle of the page to bring up the TABEL TOOLS LAYOUT tab. Click on the “View Gridlines” button on the left hand side of the ribbon.

Next Week On Template Tuesday – Definitions: What Is A Bleed Label Template?

How To? – How To Use Label Planet’s Text Box Label Templates

Tuesday, June 5th, 2018

One of the formats we provide for our Word label templates is Text Box Label Templates. In this week’s Template Tuesday, we’ll explain what these label templates are, when to use them, and how to use them to design and print your own self adhesive labels.

What Are Text Box Label Templates?

Here at Label Planet, we provide label templates for all of our label sizes. We supply a range of template formats to suit the various designs that our customers may wish to create. One of these is our text box label templates format.

In this format, your label template will include a text box in each of the blank labels on your sheet.

text box label templates

Each text box has a centralised layout and allows your text to fit neatly within each blank label. You can use the text boxes as they are or change them to suit the design you are creating.

When Should You Use Text Box Label Templates?

Our text box label templates are designed to create sticky labels that are printed with text only. The text boxes are set up to ensure that your design fits neatly within your blank labels. So you don’t have to worry about making too many adjustments yourself. These label templates are brilliant for beginners who haven’t designed self adhesive labels at all. They’re especially useful if you’re not confident using Word’s tools to adjust a label template to perfect your alignment. This label template does most of the work for you. All you need to do is replace the text in each text box and choose any style elements that you want to add to personalise your design. Of course, you can also use these label templates if you’re more of a template expert but you want a label template that speeds up the process of adding your design.

How Do You Use Text Box Label Templates?

Left click inside the first text box. This will allow you to select the existing placeholder text and delete it. Type in the text you want printed onto your sticky labels. Repeat this process for each of the text boxes or use copy and paste to speed things up…

  • Select and copy the text you have entered into the first text box. Click into the second text box, delete the existing text, and then paste your text into that text box. Repeat for each of the text boxes in your label template. OR…
  • Delete all of the text boxes – EXCEPT FOR THE FIRST ONE. Select the first label (including the text box) by positioning your cursor in the bottom left corner of the first label and triple clicking the left button on your mouse quickly. Copy this selection and then paste it into the rest of your blank labels.

text box label templates - adding your own textYou can simply replace the existing text with your own text and print your sticky labels. Alternatively, you may wish to add some additional design features. When working with text-based designs, the main ways to add design elements is to alter the font and to add elements like a coloured background or image.

If you wish to do this, we recommend setting up your design in the first blank label, removing the rest of the text boxes, and using copy and paste to fill in your label template.

How To Change The Font Of Your Text Box

You can change the font of your text BEFORE or AFTER adding your text.

  • BEFORE: Delete the existing placeholder text from the first text box. Select your font and style options using the “Font” section of the HOME tab and/or the “WordArt Styles” section of the DRAWING TOOLS FORMAT tab. Then type in your required font.
  • AFTER: Delete the existing text from the first text box and type in (or paste in) your required text. Select your text and then apply your preferred font and style options.

text box label templates - choosing font and style optionsYou can also change the style of the text box itself. For example, you can add a border or coloured background to your text boxes. Click on the DRAWING TOOLS FORMAT tab at the top of the page to change the format of your text box using the tools in the “Shape Styles” section.

Take care when adding coloured backgrounds and borders. You need to consider the shape and layout of your label size to avoid white edges appearing on your printed sticky labels. If you add a coloured background, your text box must fill each blank label (or overlap it slightly if possible). If you use a border, make it thick enough to overlap the edges of your blank labels. This increases the overall size of your text box, so you may need to resize your text box to get the correct alignment.

How To Add Images & Backgrounds To Your Text Box Label Template

You can add images or additional text boxes next to the existing text boxes.

Adding Additional Elements Next To Your Text Box

First, reduce the size of the existing text box to make room for your addition. Next, use the INSERT tab to insert your image or text box (or paste an image / text box copied from elsewhere). We recommend making sure your image is the right size before pasting it into your label template. We also recommend changing the Wrap Text format to Tight. To do this, select your image and click on the PICTURE TOOLS FORMAT tab that appears at the top of the page. Click on “Wrap Text” and select “Tight”. This will allow you much greater control over the positioning of your image within your label design.

text box label template - adding an image

Adding Additional Elements Behind Your Text Box

Alternatively, you could add an image or background colour behind your text box.

When adding a background image, you need to make your text box transparent as they are solid white in colour by default. Select the text box and click on the DRAWING TOOLS FORMAT tab at the top of the page. Click on “Shape Fill” and select “No Fill”. Next, insert your image. You may need to resize the image to fill your blank label. You should also change the Wrap Text format to Tight. Next, select your text box and click on the DRAWING TOOLS FORMAT tab. Click on “Bring Forward” and select “Bring To Front”. This will layer your text box on top of your image.

text box label templates - background layers

You can also add a background colour by changing the colour of the template itself (which is basically a table). Select the table by moving your cursor to the top left of the table until it turns into a four headed arrow. Left click once to select the table. Now you can click on the TABLE TOOLS DESIGN tab at the top of the page and use the “Shading” option to add a background colour. Remember that this colour will ONLY apply to your template. If you want your text boxes to match, you will either need to add the same colour background to your text box or make your text box transparent. Both can be done using the “Shape Fill” option in the DRAWING TOOLS FORMAT tab.

Remember, if you are adding any additional elements we strongly recommend setting up your design in the first blank label. Delete the existing text boxes from the rest of the label template. Then select your first completed label. Place your cursor in the bottom left corner and triple click the left button quickly. Copy your design and then paste it into the rest of your blank labels.

Download A Text Box Label Template From Label Planet

To download any of our label templates, simply head on over to our Label Templates home page. Click on your label shape and then select your label size from the list. This takes you to the individual Label Template information page for your self adhesive labels. Our label template download links can be found in the middle of this page. You will find our text box label templates under the Word Templates column. Decide if you want a portrait or landscape text box label template (if applicable) and left click once on the purple link to start the download process.

Your label template will usually be downloaded to your Downloads folder. If you are asked if you want to open or save the file, we recommend choosing save. We also recommend opening Word (or other word processing software) first and using “File” > “Open” to locate and open your label template. Remember, the file will probably be locked for security reasons because you downloaded it from the internet. There should be a yellow banner going across the top of the page. Click on the Enable Editing button to unlock the label template.

You should be able to see the layout of your sticky labels in the form of a dotted grey outline. If you cannot see this outline, Table Gridlines are turned off. To turn them on again, left click once anywhere in the middle of the page to bring up the TABEL TOOLS LAYOUT tab. Click on the “View Gridlines” button on the left hand side of the ribbon.

Next Week On Template Tuesday – How To? How To Use Label Planet’s Mirrored Text Box Label Templates

How To? – How To Print A Sheet Of Address Labels Using Create Labels In Word

Tuesday, May 8th, 2018

In this week’s Template Tuesday post, we’re going to show you how to print a sheet of address labels in Word. This guide will explain how to use Word’s built-in Create Labels tool to quickly and easily set up a template to print a sheet of self adhesive labels with your required address.

NB: This method is only suitable for printing a sheet of sticky labels with the SAME address.

CREATE LABELS – STEP ONE: OPEN THE CREATE LABELS TOOL

1. Open Word and create a new Blank Document.
2. Click on the MAILINGS tab at the top of the page.
3. In the “Create” section on the left hand side of the ribbon, click on LABELS.

The “Create Labels” tool will now appear on your screen as box entitled “Envelopes and Labels”.

Word Label Templates - Create Address Labels - Create Labels

CREATE LABELS – STEP TWO: SELECT A COMPATIBLE LABEL TEMPLATE

1. Click on the OPTIONS button. This opens a new box entitled “Label Options”.
2. “Printer information” must be set to PAGE PRINTERS and “Tray” must be set to your media bypass tray – if your printer has one.
3. Set the “Label vendor” to AVERY A4/A5.
4. Select a compatible Avery Labels Template code from the list and click OK.

If you have purchased self adhesive labels from Label Planet, you can find compatible Avery codes by clicking on the purple “Label Templates And Printing Information” link on the relevant product page.

NB: if your A4 labels don’t have a compatible Avery Template, you need to click on NEW LABEL and set up your own label template. You can find instructions on how to do this here.

Word Label Templates - Create Address Labels - Select Label Template

CREATE LABELS – STEP THREE: ENTER YOUR ADDRESS

1. Type your address into the ADDRESS BOX.

If you simply want a plain sheet of address labels, you can now load your A4 labels into your printer and press print.

Word Label Templates - Create Address Labels - Add AddressTo alter the design of your address labels (e.g. by adding a border, background, image or changing the font style), click on NEW DOCUMENT. This will open a new document containing a label template with your address added into each blank label.

Word Label Templates - Create Address Labels - Edit And Print Your Address Labels

CREATE LABELS – STEP FOUR: PRINT YOUR LABEL TEMPLATE

As mentioned above, if you are printing plain address labels you simply press the print button. If you have created a new label template document to add more design work to your address labels, you have more control over the print process. We recommend following these steps:

1. Press FILE and then PRINT to get to the print preview page. Click on PRINTER PROPERTIES and confirm the following;

  • The page size is set to A4.
  • No scaling options are set (e.g. less than 100% or “Fit to Page/Sheet”).
  • No options such as “Use Default/Driver Settings” or “Ignore Printer Settings” are selected.

2. Test print your address labels by loading blank paper into your printer. Hold your test print against a sheet of your blank labels and hold both up to a light source to confirm that the alignment is correct. You can then make any necessary adjustments before you…
3. Load your sheet labels into the media bypass tray (if your printer has one) and print your address labels.

We highly recommend using this method (rather than printing directly from the Create Labels tool). It gives you easy access to your printer’s print settings and lets you perform a test print. Without these options, you may find that you end up with a set of misaligned (and unusable) address labels.

Next Week On Template Tuesday: How To? – How To Print Address Labels Using “Mail Merge” In Word

How To? – How To Use Copy & Paste To Fill In A Word Template

Tuesday, May 1st, 2018

Why Should You Use Copy & Paste To Complete Label Templates?

At Label Planet, we highly recommend using copy and paste to complete Word label templates. Copy and paste allows you to duplicate your design more accurately compared to setting up each label one by one. It’s also a much faster way of completing label templates.

Please note: this tip assumes you are creating label templates with a single design (or multiple copies of two or more designs). To print a different design onto each sticky label, you will need to set each one up individually.

The way you use copy and paste to complete label templates will depend on whether or not there are any gaps between your blank labels. We’ve created guides for three different A4 label layouts.

First you will need to set up your required design in the top left label. Next select your design. Place your cursor in the bottom left corner of the first label and quickly triple click the left button. This selects the content AND formatting options you have applied to your design. Finally, copy your design using the Copy icon in the Home tab at the top of the page or use a keyboard shortcut by pressing the Control Key (Ctrl) [Windows] / Command Key (⌘) [Mac] and the C key.

Copy & Paste – Label Templates With No Gaps

If there are no gaps, select the entire label template and paste into all of the blank labels in one go.

You can use this technique with any of our RECTANGULAR LABELS WITH SQUARE CUT CORNERS.

  • Put your cursor above the first column until it turns into a solid black arrow pointing downwards.
  • Click and hold down the left button as you move your cursor above the last column.
  • Release the button and your blank labels will be highlighted by a light grey background.
  • Paste your design into the cells using the Paste icon in the Home tab or use a keyboard shortcut by pressing the Control Key (Ctrl) [Windows] / Command Key (⌘) [Mac] and the V key.

Label Planet - copy and paste - label template with no gaps

Copy & Paste – Label Templates With Gaps Between Columns Only

If there are gaps between the columns of blank labels you cannot simply select the entire label template. You will end up pasting your design into the gaps as well as into the blank labels. Usually, this results in your designs being misaligned, overlapped, or both when you try to print your label template.

To use copy and paste to complete your label template, you need to select just the columns of blank labels.

You can use this technique with most of our RECTANGULAR LABELS WITH ROUNDED CORNERS.

  • Position your cursor above the first column of blank labels until it turns into a solid black arrow pointing downwards. Click the left button to select that column.
  • Move your cursor above the second column of blank labels (NOT the gap between the first and second columns).
  • Hold down the Control Key (Ctrl) [Windows] / Command Key (⌘) [Mac] on your keyboard as you left click once to select that second column. Both the first and second columns of blank labels should now be highlighted in grey to indicate they are selected. The column representing the gap between them should remain non-highlighted.
  • Repeat this process for each column of blank labels.
  • Paste your design into the cells using the Paste icon or the keyboard shortcut.

Label Planet - copy and paste - label template with gaps between columns

Copy & Paste – Label Templates With Gaps Between Columns & Rows

If there are gaps between the columns AND rows of blank labels, you could complete your label template by pasting your design into each label. This is fine for label templates with only a few blank labels per sheet but becomes a time consuming process with smaller label sizes.

We recommend using copy and paste (and a careful selection process) to fill in groups of blank labels and so speed up the process of completing your label templates.

You can use this technique with our ROUND LABELS, OVAL LABELS, and SQUARE LABELS.

  • Paste your design into each of the blank labels in the top row individually. Left click inside each blank labels and use the Paste icon or keyboard shortcut to add your design. Repeat this for each blank label in the top row.
  • Next select the top row – including the blank labels and the gaps. Position your cursor inside the first label. Click and hold down the left button as you drag your cursor inside the last label in the row. Release the button and the top row should now be highlighted in grey to indicate it has been selected.
    If your design fills your blank labels you may end up selecting your design rather than the blank label. In this case, left click inside the gap below the first label in the top row. Use the up arrow key on your keyboard to move the cursor inside the first label. Hold down the shift key on your keyboard and use the right arrow key to move your cursor into the last label in the top row.
  • Copy the top row using the Copy icon or the keyboard shortcut.
  • Now left click once inside the first label in the second row. Use the Paste icon or the keyboard shortcut to paste your design into that entire second row. Repeat this process with the first label in each of the rows of blank labels in your label template until it is complete.

Label Planet - copy and paste - label template with gaps all round

Next Week On Template Tuesday: How To? – How To Print Address Labels Using “Mail Merge” In Word

How To? – How To Add Designs To Word Label Templates

Tuesday, April 10th, 2018

This week, we’re looking at tools in Word that you can use when designing label templates. If you are creating a simple text-based design, you simply type your text into your template. Alternatively, to create a design that contains other elements (like images), there are TWO basic ways to add your design. You can use Word’s design tools to create new content OR use copy and paste to add content that exists in an external source.

Designing Label Templates – Using Word’s Design Tools

To use Word’s design tools, you first need to insert an item into your label template. This could be a text box, WordArt, a shape, or an image that you have saved as a file on your computer. To add any of these items, click on the “Insert” tab at the top of the page and then select the item you want to add.

To edit your item or change the formatting applied to that item, you need to select it (by left clicking on it once) to bring up an additional formatting tab at the top of the page. For images this will be the Picture Tools Format tab and for text boxes, shapes, and WordArt this will be the Drawing Tools Format tab.

Label Templates Word Design Tools Picture Tools TabYou can use these tabs to change the size, colour, and positioning of your items to build up your required design.

Designing Labels Templates – Using Copy & Paste

This option allows you to insert elements into your design that have been set up somewhere else. For example, if you are creating product labels, you may have content you want to include in your design set up in other documents – such as a spreadsheet containing product details, a Word document containing instructions for use or a list of ingredients, or a copy of your company logo. You can use copy and paste to insert all of these elements into your label template.

Copy & Paste A Saved Image File

There are a few ways to copy and paste an image that is saved as an individual file on your computer.

  • Use your file manager to locate your saved image file. For Windows this is the “File Explorer” and for MacOS this is the “Finder”. Right click on the image file and select “Copy” (for MacOS you can use a two-finger tap on your trackpad or hold down the Control key as you click to “right click”). Go back to your label template and select “Paste” from the Home tab.
    Alternatively, you can use keyboard shortcuts to copy and paste. If you are using Windows, you should hold down the Control Key (Ctrl) on your keyboard and press C to copy or V to paste. If you are using MacOS, you hold down the Command Key (⌘) and press C or V.
  • Open your saved image file using an image viewer or editor. The menu should include tools to select your image and copy it. Go back to your label template and select “Paste” from the Home tab.
  • Use your file manager to locate your saved image file. Select your saved image by left clicking on it and hold down the button on your mouse as you move your cursor to your label template. Release the button to copy your image to your label template.

If you use copy and paste, you may experience conversion issues depending on the original file format of your image. To avoid this issue, we recommend opening a new blank Word document and pasting your image into that document. Then copy and paste that image into your label template.

Please note: you can also use the “Insert” tab to insert saved image files. Click on Insert, select Pictures, and browse to your saved file. Select that file to insert it into your label template.

Copy & Paste Content From An Existing File Or External Source

Copy and paste can also transfer existing content from an external source into your label template. You can copy and paste in a number of ways:

  • POINT AND CLICK: most software will have a copy option in its menus. Select your item by left clicking on it once or highlight a section of text that you want to copy. Then click on the copy option in the menu. Alternatively, you should be able to right click on your item and select copy from a list of options. You then go back to your label template and select “Paste” under the Home tab at the top of the page.
  • KEYBOARD SHORTCUTS: follow the steps above but instead of clicking on copy and paste options use your keyboard to perform these actions. If you are using Windows, you should hold down the Control Key (Ctrl) on your keyboard and press C to copy or V to paste. If you are using MacOS, you hold down the Command Key (⌘) and press C or V.
  • DRAG AND DROP: select your item as described above, then hold down the left button on your mouse as your move your cursor to the location where you want to insert your item. Release the button to paste your item into your label template.

We recommend using copy and paste to create label templates where all of your sticky labels share the same design. Set up your design in the top left label and then use copy and paste to add this design into the remainder of the blank labels in your label template. This is much quicker and much more accurate than trying to create your design in each individual blank label.

Next Week On Template Tuesday: Paste Options In Word Label Templates 101

Label Templates; Designing & Printing Labels – A Summary

Tuesday, December 12th, 2017

Over the last 31(!) weeks we’ve looked at the process of designing and printing your own self adhesive labels; from sourcing a label template, adding a design to your label template, and finally printing your label template onto your blank labels (including a few troubleshooting tips to help you out at each stage).

While printing your own A4 labels can be a quick, easy, and cost effective way to create a set of sticky labels that are just perfect for whatever project you’ve got in mind, there are plenty of small things that can make a big difference to how well (or otherwise) your blank labels turn out.

While some small things ruin the alignment of your label template, others can help to create the perfect print on your A4 labels – the trick is knowing how to avoid potential problems and how to use certain tools effectively, which isn’t always easy (or obvious) if you don’t have much experience designing and printing your own adhesive labels.

Our hope is that this label template blog will be a useful resource for anyone to use when they need to design and print their own A4 labels, so for our last post of the year we’ve created a summary of all the topics we’ve covered so far (before we return next year to examine even more template troubles, tricks, and troubleshooting tips!)…

The TEN Things You Need To Print Your Own Labels

A brief list of the things you’ll need when printing A4 labels.

The Different Types Of Templates (& How To Choose The Right One For You)

An explanation of the difference between standalone and built-in label templates, single design and multiple design label templates, and Word templates and PDF templates, along with definitions of Portrait, Landscape, Text Box, Mirrored, Bleed, and “Alternative” templates.

How To Find & Open A Label Template

Step by step instructions for how to find and open built-in templates and standalone templates.

How To Make Your Own Label Template

A guide to creating your own label template with step by step instructions for Word.

Label Templates – Avery Templates 101

A guide to Avery templates, including advice on finding a compatible Avery code for your Label Planet labels.

Troubleshooting Tips For Choosing The Right Label Template

If you’re having trouble (or have questions about) finding the right label template for your label size, our troubleshooting tips are a good place to start!

Always Start With A Plan

A brief bit of advice on how to start designing a label template.

Build From The Background Forward

Top tips for creating label designs that are made up of multiple layers.

Copy & Paste 101

A beginner’s guide to what “copy and paste” actually means and how to use these tools.

How To Select (Highlight) Content In Word

A beginner’s guide to selecting different items in Word (and how to this as effectively as possible).

Copy & Paste 102

A guide to using copy and paste when designing a label template.

Getting Things In Line With The Perfect Alignment

A brief definition of what the term “alignment” actually means with regards to label templates.

Choosing Suitable Shapes & Logical Layouts

Top tips for creating the perfect label design for the specific label shape and layout of your blank labels.

Tackling Text-Only Templates

Top tips for designing label templates that only contain text.

Getting Inventive With Image-Only Templates

Top tips for designing label templates that only contain images.

Tops Tips For Combining Text & Images In Word

Top tips for designing label templates that contain text and images.

Finding Word’s Design Tools & Features

A guide to the design tools available in Word, along with instructions on how to find and use them effectively.

Using Word’s Arrange Toolbar To Create A Perfectly Arranged Template

A more detailed guide to the “Arrange” set of design tools in Word and how they can help to create a perfect design in your label template.

Labels & Mail Merges 101

A guide to Mail Merge tools and a step by step guide to using Word’s “Step By Step Mail Merge Wizard” to create address labels or product labels from a single label template and a data source.

How To Create Window Stickers Using A Mirrored Template In Word

A guide to using Mirrored templates in Word to create window stickers that can be applied onto one side of a window and read from the other side.

When & How To Use A Bleed Template

A guide to what Bleed templates are and how they can be used to create perfectly printed self adhesive labels.

Top Tips For…Rectangular Labels

Top tips for designing a label template for rectangular labels.

Top Tips For…Round Labels & Oval Labels

Top tips for designing a label template for round labels, circular labels, and oval labels.

Why The Kiss Principle Creates Perfectly Practical Labels

A brief bit of advice about how keeping things simple can help to create the perfect label template (without driving yourself crazy in the process).

Troubleshooting Tips For Trouble-Free Label Designs

If you’re having trouble (or have questions about) designing a label template, these troubleshooting tips should help you pull off your design with a minimal amount of fuss!

Printing Templates 101

A brief guide to what happens when you “press print”.

Choosing The Right Printer To Print Your Labels

Top tips for choosing the “right” printer to print your own A4 labels, including information about laser printers, inkjet printers, dedicated printers, all-in-one printers, photo printers, print media, media types and media weights, media bypass trays, printer resolution, and “extra” features that are ideal for printing adhesive labels.

Choosing The Right Print Settings To Print Your Labels

A guide to choosing the right print settings to get the best possible alignment and print quality on self adhesive labels.

Top Tips For Loading Your Labels To Align Your Design Perfectly

Top tips for loading your printer labels correctly to avoid alignment issues.

The First Rule Of Printing Labels: ALWAYS DO A TEST PRINT FIRST

THE ONE TIP THAT EVERYONE SHOULD ALWAYS FOLLOW!

Troubleshooting Tips For Trouble-Free Printing

If you’re having trouble (or have questions about) printing a label template accurately, these troubleshooting tips should help you to fix any alignment or print quality issues that you encounter when printing laser labels or inkjet labels.


And that’s all folks!

We’ll be back in January with more tips and tricks to designing and printing your own label templates; if you have any suggestions or questions that you’d like us to feature in the Label Planet Template Blog, simply send us an email and we’ll do our best to provide a suitable solution!

Remember, if you need any advice or tips you can always visit our Help Pages for Guides and Troubleshooting Tips – and you’ll find label templates for all of our label sizes on our dedicated Label Templates pages.

Designing A Label Template – Troubleshooting Tips For Trouble-Free Label Designs

Tuesday, October 24th, 2017

Over the last sixteen weeks, we’ve been taking a closer look at the process of adding a label design to a label template, including advice on implementing a design that works for you, for your labels, and for the limitations of your software (along with specific guides on how to find and use Word’s design tools and features).

This week’s post gathers together all of the content from the last few months to create a hitlist of top tips to make the process of designing your labels as trouble-free as possible.

Presenting Label Planet’s Top Ten Top Tips For Designing Your Own Label Template!

1. Keep Things Simple

Most people print their own labels because it is a quick and easy way for them to create bespoke or personalise labels without having to spend time and money paying a designer and printer to do the job for them. Choosing an overly complex design is a sure-fire way to find yourself wasting time and money trying to replicate a design that far exceeds the limitations of your software, your hardware, and/or your own abilities when it comes to digital design.

2. Plan Your Design Before You Start

Taking a moment to sketch out your design (and type out the contents of your label) is a quick way to double check that:

  • Your design fits onto your labels without looking cluttered or messy
  • Your label design accomplishes what you need it to do AND looks professional

Making changes to a hand-drawn sketch is MUCH quicker and easier than getting partway through your design and realising that it isn’t going to work.

3. Start With The Background & Work Forward

If you’re creating a design with a lot of different elements (that need to be layered or that overlap to create your completed design) then it is always best to start with the “background” layer and work your way forward.

4. Use Cut, Copy, & Paste (Carefully) To Make The Design Process Quicker & More Accurate

Cut, copy, and paste are easy to use functions that can speed up the entire process of designing a label template; you can use these functions to add different elements to your template from an external source AND you can also use them to replicate your design in order to add it to all of the labels within your template. Using copy and paste is a much more accurate way to adjust and/or replicate your design by duplicating one item rather than inserting multiple items and attempting to adjust them one by one AND it can be used to duplicate both content and the formatting options you have applied to your content.

5. Remember That Formatting Matters

If you don’t bother to change certain formatting options from their defaults, you may find that you are limited in the tools that are available to you AND in how accurate you can be with the changes that you make to the various elements within your design – especially when it comes to positioning and layering different elements together.

6. Centralise Your Design

Using a centralised layout makes it easier to make sure that ALL of your design fits neatly onto ALL of your labels – and can avoid problems around the edges of your labels (see tip 7).

7. Take Care At The Edges

If your label design goes all the way to the edge of each label, you need to make sure that you aren’t setting yourself up for alignment nightmares when you come to print your labels; avoid narrow borders (which are nearly impossible to align perfectly) and only use a full colour background if you have space to overlap your design slightly (without creating a mismatch on labels that “butt up” against one another).

8. Don’t Be Afraid To Use Bleed

While you might be preoccupied with making sure that your design fits INSIDE each label, if you want to add a coloured background or a border you may be better off deliberately oversizing your design so that it overlaps (bleeds over) the edges of your labels to prevent any white edging appearing on your labels.

9. Be Aware Of The Unprintable Area

Most desktop printers cannot print all the way to the edge of an A4 sheet, creating an “unprintable area” around the edges of a label sheet; if any part of any of your labels falls into the unprintable area of your particular printer then you need to make sure that your design doesn’t involve adding any print to those parts of your labels.

10. Put Your Text In Text Boxes

If you are creating multiple sections of text, it may be worth putting each section into its own text box so that you have greater control over where the different elements in your design sit on each label. Adding your text as one block and then trying to manually space out your text to create your required design layout is unlikely to give you anything like the precision you need to replicate your design as accurately as you’d like.

Next Week On Template Tuesday: Printing A Label Template – Printing Templates 101